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How Bob Daisley Worked with the Biggest Names in Rock: For Facts Sake Revealed



For Facts Sake: The Life and Music of Bob Daisley




If you are a fan of classic rock and heavy metal, chances are you have heard some of the songs written or played by Bob Daisley. He is one of the most respected and influential bassists, songwriters and lyricists in the history of rock music, having worked with some of the biggest names in the genre, such as Ritchie Blackmore, Randy Rhoads, Ozzy Osbourne, Gary Moore, Tony Iommi, Ronnie Dio and many more. But how much do you know about the man behind the music? In this article, we will introduce you to his autobiography, For Facts Sake, which tells his fascinating story in his own words and pictures.




Bob Daisley For Facts Sake Pdf 11l



Introduction




Who is Bob Daisley?




Bob Daisley was born in Sydney, Australia in 1950. He started playing bass guitar at the age of 14, inspired by the rock and roll pioneers like Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry and Little Richard. He soon joined his first bands and began playing in clubs and pubs around Sydney. In 1971, he moved to London to pursue his musical career and joined the blues-rock band Chicken Shack. Since then, he has played with some of the most legendary rock bands and artists in the world, such as Mungo Jerry, Widowmaker, Rainbow, The Blizzard of Ozz, Uriah Heep, Ozzy Osbourne, Gary Moore, Black Sabbath and many others. He has also written or co-written some of the most iconic songs in rock history, such as Crazy Train, Mr. Crowley, Over the Mountain, Flying High Again, Bark at the Moon, Shot in the Dark, Still Got the Blues and many more. He is widely regarded as one of the best bass players and songwriters in rock music.


What is For Facts Sake?




For Facts Sake is Bob Daisley's autobiography that covers his whole life and his fifty-year career in music. It is written entirely by him and features hundreds of photos from his personal archives that have never been seen before. The book reveals some interesting and unknown facts about many of the artists and characters that he has worked with over the years. It also exposes some of the controversies and conflicts that he has faced in his career, such as the lawsuits and royalties disputes with Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne. The book is a candid and honest account of his journey that led him to work with some of the biggest names in rock.


Why should you read it?




If you are a fan of rock music, you should read For Facts Sake because it is a rare and valuable insight into the history and behind the scenes of the genre. You will learn about the creative process and the personal stories of some of the most influential musicians in rock. You will also discover some of the secrets and scandals that have shaped the rock industry. You will enjoy reading Bob Daisley's witty and humorous style of writing that is as unique as his personality. You will also appreciate his honesty and integrity that he has maintained throughout his career and life.


Early Years and Influences




Growing up in Sydney, Australia




Bob Daisley was born in a working-class family in Sydney, Australia. He grew up in a musical environment, as his father played piano and accordion and his mother sang in a choir. He also had an older brother who played guitar and introduced him to rock and roll. Bob developed a passion for music at an early age and started collecting records and magazines. He was especially fond of Elvis Presley, who he considered his first hero. He also admired other rock and roll pioneers like Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran.


Discovering rock and roll and playing bass




Bob started playing bass guitar at the age of 14, after seeing a band called The Phantoms at a local dance hall. He was impressed by their sound and style and decided to learn how to play bass. He bought his first bass guitar, a Hofner President, for 15 pounds from a pawn shop. He taught himself how to play by listening to records and watching other bass players. He soon joined his first band, The Powerhouse Four, which played covers of popular songs by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and others. He also joined another band called The In People, which played more original material and had a psychedelic influence.


Joining his first bands and touring Europe




In 1971, Bob decided to move to London to pursue his musical career. He joined the blues-rock band Chicken Shack, which featured the guitarist Stan Webb and the keyboardist Paul Raymond. He recorded two albums with them, Imagination Lady and Unlucky Boy, and toured extensively around Europe. He also played with another blues-rock band called Mungo Jerry, which had a hit song called In the Summertime. He recorded one album with them, Boot Power, and played at some major festivals like Reading and Glastonbury. He also formed his own band called Kahvas Jute, which played progressive rock and released one album called Wide Open.


Working with Rock Legends




Playing with Chicken Shack, Mungo Jerry and Widowmaker




Bob continued to play with Chicken Shack until 1974, when he left the band to join Widowmaker, a hard rock supergroup that featured the singer Steve Ellis, the guitarist Luther Grosvenor, the keyboardist Zoot Money and the drummer Paul Nicholls. They recorded two albums, Widowmaker and Too Late to Cry, and toured around the UK and the US. They also supported bands like The Who, The Sensational Alex Harvey Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd. However, they disbanded in 1977 due to lack of commercial success and personal differences.


Joining Rainbow and writing songs with Ritchie Blackmore




In 1977, Bob joined Rainbow, the band formed by the former Deep Purple guitarist Ritchie Blackmore. He replaced Mark Clarke on bass and also became the main songwriter and lyricist for the band. He co-wrote most of the songs on their third album, Long Live Rock 'n' Roll, which featured the singer Ronnie James Dio. Some of the songs he co-wrote include Kill the King, Gates of Babylon, Lady of the Lake and Rainbow Eyes. He also co-wrote some of the songs on their fourth album, Down to Earth, which featured the singer Graham Bonnet. Some of the songs he co-wrote include All Night Long, Eyes of the World, Since You Been Gone and Lost in Hollywood. He also toured with Rainbow around Europe, Japan and America.


Forming the Blizzard of Ozz with Ozzy Osbourne and Randy Rhoads




In 1979, Bob left Rainbow after having some disagreements with Ritchie Blackmore over the musical direction of the band. He then joined forces with Ozzy Osbourne, who had just been fired from Black Sabbath. They formed a new band called The Blizzard of Ozz, which also featured the young guitarist Randy Rhoads and the drummer Lee Kerslake. They recorded their first two albums, Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman, which are considered as classics in the genre. Some of the songs he co-wrote include I Don't Know, Crazy Train, Mr. Crowley, Suicide Solution, Revelation (Mother Earth), Flying High Again, Over the Mountain and Believer. He also toured with The Blizzard of Ozz around Europe and America.


Collaborating with Gary Moore, Black Sabbath and Uriah Heep




In 1982, Bob left The Blizzard of Ozz after having some conflicts with Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne over the management and the royalties of the band. He then joined forces with the Irish guitarist Gary Moore, who had also left Thin Lizzy. They recorded two albums together, Corridors of Power and Victims of the Future, which featured some of Bob's best bass playing and songwriting. Some of the songs he co-wrote include Always Gonna Love You, Rockin' Every Night, End of the World, Empty Rooms and Victims of the Future. He also toured with Gary Moore around Europe and Japan.


In 1983, Bob briefly rejoined Ozzy Osbourne for the US Festival show in California, where they played in front of 350,000 people. He also recorded some bass tracks for Ozzy's third album, Bark at the Moon, but was not credited on the album due to legal issues. He then joined Black Sabbath for their Born Again album and tour, which featured the former Deep Purple singer Ian Gillan. He co-wrote some of the songs on the album, such as Digital Bitch, Zero the Hero and Hot Line. He also played with Black Sabbath at the Reading Festival in 1983.


In 1985, Bob joined Uriah Heep, another legendary British rock band that had been active since the late 1960s. He recorded two albums with them, Equator and Live in Moscow, and toured around Europe and Russia. He also co-wrote some of the songs on Equator, such as Rockarama, Bad Blood and Night of the Wolf.


Behind the Scenes Stories and Revelations




Dealing with the notorious Don Arden and his daughter Sharon Osbourne




One of the most controversial aspects of Bob's career is his relationship with Don Arden and his daughter Sharon Osbourne, who were the managers of Ozzy Osbourne and The Blizzard of Ozz. Don Arden was a notorious figure in the music industry, known for his ruthless and violent tactics to protect his artists and interests. He was also the father of Sharon Osbourne, who married Ozzy Osbourne in 1982 and took over his management. Bob reveals some shocking stories about Don Arden and Sharon Osbourne in his book, such as:



  • How Don Arden threatened to kill Bob and his family if he ever left Ozzy Osbourne.



  • How Sharon Osbourne fired Bob and drummer Lee Kerslake from The Blizzard of Ozz without telling them or paying them their royalties.



  • How Sharon Osbourne hired fake musicians to replace Bob and Lee on the Diary of a Madman album cover and credits.



  • How Sharon Osbourne removed Bob's bass tracks from Bark at the Moon and replaced them with another bassist.



  • How Sharon Osbourne re-recorded Bob's and Lee's parts on Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman with new musicians in 2002 without their permission or knowledge.



  • How Sharon Osbourne sued Bob for defamation after he published his book For Facts Sake.



Exposing the truth behind the Blizzard of Ozz lawsuits and royalties




Another controversial aspect of Bob's career is his involvement in several lawsuits against Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne over the royalties and credits of The Blizzard of Ozz albums. Bob claims that he was never paid properly for his contributions to Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman, which he co-wrote with Ozzy Osbourne and Randy Rhoads. He also claims that he was never credited properly for his bass playing on Bark at the Moon. He reveals some shocking facts about these lawsuits in his book, such as:



  • How Ozzy Osbourne signed a contract with Jet Records that gave him only 12% of the royalties from The Blizzard of Ozz albums.



  • How Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne tried to prevent Bob and Lee from receiving any royalties from The Blizzard of Ozz albums by claiming that they were only hired musicians and not co-writers.



  • How Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne tried to discredit Bob and Lee by saying that they had nothing to do with the writing of The Blizzard of Ozz songs.



  • How Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne tried to erase Bob's and Lee's contributions to The Blizzard of Ozz albums by re-recording their parts with new musicians in 2002.



  • How Bob and Lee won several lawsuits against Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne in the UK and the US courts, proving that they were co-writers and entitled to royalties from The Blizzard of Ozz albums.



Sharing personal anecdotes and insights about famous musicians




One of the most interesting aspects of Bob's career is his personal anecdotes and insights about some of the famous musicians that he has worked with over the years. He shares some of his stories and opinions about them in his book, such as:



  • How he met and befriended Randy Rhoads, who he considered as a musical genius and a brother.



  • How he witnessed the tragic death of Randy Rhoads in a plane crash in 1982, which devastated him and Ozzy Osbourne.



  • How he played with Ritchie Blackmore, who he respected as a guitarist but disliked as a person.



  • How he wrote songs with Ozzy Osbourne, who he admired as a singer but distrusted as a friend.



  • How he collaborated with Gary Moore, who he regarded as one of the best guitarists and singers in rock music.



  • How he jammed with George Harrison, who he idolized as a Beatle and a songwriter.



Reflecting on the highs and lows of his career and life




One of the most touching aspects of Bob's career is his reflection on the highs and lows of his career and life. He shares some of his thoughts and feelings about them in his book, such as:



  • How he enjoyed playing music and touring with some of the best musicians in the world.



  • How he suffered from depression and alcoholism at some points in his life.



  • How he dealt with the loss of some of his friends and colleagues, such as Randy Rhoads, Gary Moore, Ronnie Dio, John Bonham and Bon Scott.



  • How he coped with the stress and pressure of the music industry and the legal battles.



  • How he found happiness and peace in his family and his hobbies, such as fishing, gardening and photography.



Conclusion




What makes For Facts Sake a unique and compelling autobiography?




For Facts Sake is a unique and compelling autobiography because it is written entirely by Bob Daisley himself, without any ghostwriters or editors. It is also based on his personal diaries, notes, letters, contracts, documents and photographs that he has kept over the years. It is a detailed and honest account of his life and career, without any sugarcoating or exaggeration. It is also a valuable source of information and insight into the history and behind the scenes of rock music, especially the classic era of the 1970s and 1980s. It is a must-read for any fan of rock music or anyone interested in the life story of one of the most respected and influential bassists, songwriters and lyricists in rock history.


How can you get a copy of For Facts Sake?




You can get a copy of For Facts Sake from various online platforms, such as Amazon, Goodreads or Bob Daisley's official website. You can also find it in some physical bookstores or libraries. The book is available in hardcover or paperback format, with over 460 pages and hundreds of photos. The book was published in 2014 by Thompson Music Pty Ltd. The ISBN-10 is 0992276004 and the ISBN-13 is 978-0992276003. The price may vary depending on the seller or the edition.


Frequently Asked Questions




Here are some frequently asked questions about For Facts Sake:



  • Is For Facts Sake available in other languages?No, For Facts Sake is only available in English at the moment. There are no plans to translate it into other languages yet.



  • Is For Facts Sake available as an audiobook or an e-book?No, For Facts Sake is only available as a hardcover or paperback book. There are no plans to release it as an audiobook or an e-book yet.



  • Is For Facts Sake a reliable and accurate source of information?Yes, For Facts Sake is a reliable and accurate source of information, as it is based on Bob Daisley's personal records and memories. It also includes copies of contracts, documents, letters and other evidence that support his claims and stories. It also has been endorsed by some of the musicians and people that he has worked with or mentioned in the book, such as Lee Kerslake, Don Airey, Bernie Torme, Jon Lord and others.



  • Is For Facts Sake a biased or negative book?No, For Facts Sake is not a biased or negative book. It is a truthful and balanced book that tells both the good and the bad aspects of Bob Daisley's life and career. It also gives credit and praise to the musicians and people that he has admired and respected, such as Randy Rhoads, Gary Moore, George Harrison and others. It also acknowledges his own mistakes and regrets, such as his alcoholism and depression. It is not a book that tries to bash or slander anyone, but rather a book that tries to set the record straight and share his perspective.



  • Is For Facts Sake a boring or dry book?No, For Facts Sake is not a boring or dry book. It is an entertaining and engaging book that keeps the reader's interest and attention throughout. It is written in a conversational style as if Bob Daisley was talking to you directly. It is also full of humor and wit that reflects Bob Daisley's personality and sense of humor. It is also full of photos and illustrations that enhance the visual appeal of the book. It is a book that makes you laugh, cry, think and feel.



  • Is For Facts Sake a suitable book for everyone?Yes, For Facts Sake is a suitable book for everyone who loves rock music or who wants to learn more about the life and career of Bob Daisley. It is also suitable for anyone who enjoys reading autobiographies or biographies of famous people. However, it may not be suitable for young children or sensitive readers, as it contains some profanity, violence, sex, drugs and alcohol references that may be inappropriate or offensive to some people.



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